Step 1. The cocoa beans are cleaned to remove all extraneous material.

Step 2. To bring out the chocolate flavour and colour, the beans are roasted. The temperature, time and degree of moisture involved in roasting depend on the type of beans used and the sort of chocolate or product required from the process.

Step 3. A winnowing machine is used to remove the shells from the beans to leave just the cocoa nibs.

Step 4. The cocoa nibs undergo alkalisation, usually with potassium carbonate, to develop the flavour and colour.

Step 5. The nibs are then milled to create cocoa liquor (cocoa particles suspended in cocoa butter). The temperature and degree of milling varies according to the type of nib used and the product required.

Step 6. Manufacturers generally use more than one type of bean in their products and therefore the different beans have to be blended together to the required formula.

Step 7. The cocoa liquor is pressed to extract the cocoa butter leaving a solid mass called cocoa presscake. The amount of butter extracted from the liquor is controlled by the manufacturer to produce presscake with different proportions of fat.

Step 8. The processing now takes two different directions. The cocoa butter is used in the manufacture of chocolate. The cocoa presscake is broken into small pieces to form kibbled presscake which is then pulverised to form cocoa powder.

Step 9. Cocoa liquor is used to form chocolate through the addition of cocoa butter. Other ingredients such as sugar, milk, emulsifying agents and cocoa butter equivalents are also added and mixed. The proportions of the different ingredients depends on the type of chocolate being made.

Step 10. The mixture then undergoes a refining process by travelling through a series of rollers until a smooth paste is formed. Refining improves the texture of the chocolate.

Step 11. The next process, conching, further develops flavour and texture. Conching is a kneading or smoothing process. The speed, duration and temperature of the kneading affect the flavour. An alternative to conching is an emulsifying process using a machine that works like an egg beater.

Step 12. The mixture is then tempered or passed through a heating, cooling and reheating process. This prevents discolouration and fat bloom in the product by preventing certain crystalline formations of cocoa butter developing.

Step 13. The mixture is then put into moulds or used for enrobing fillings and cooled in a cooling chamber.

Step 14. The chocolate is then packaged for distribution to retail outlets.

References:
The story of chocolate. The Chocolate Manufacturers Association of the USA
Dand, R. The International Cocoa Trade. 3rd edition, Woodhead Publishing, 2011
Minifie, B.W. Chocolate, cocoa and confectionery science and technology. 3rd edition. Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1989

ICCO Secretariat

International Cocoa Organization
Westgate House
Ealing
London W5 1YY
United Kingdom

Tel:  +44 (0)20 8991 6000
Fax: +44 (0)20 8997 4372
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

ICCO Agreements

The ICCO International Cocoa Agreement is available to download in Acrobat PDF format.

Go to the ICCO Agreements page

ICCO Membership Procedure

The procedures for becoming a member of the International Cocoa Organization are provided in Articles 52 to 57 of the International Cocoa Agreement, 2010.

How to Become an ICCO Member - International Cocoa Agreement 2010